Teaching to Their Strengths with Shawna Wingert

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Shawna Wingert of Different by Design Learning joins us to talk about teaching to our children's strengths in the homeschool.

Before she became a homeschool mom (unexpectedly) Shawna Wingert was a corporate consultant teaching big-league companies how to maximize employee productivity and boost morale by focusing on making the best use of employee strengths rather than trying to correct weaknesses.

When Shawna began homeschooling, she wondered if these same science-based, researched-backed approaches could work with her children in her home as well. And now, with two nearly-grown sons of her own and loads of experience coaching other moms, she can confidently say, that yes, it does!

Listen in as Shawna describes her experience and encourages us to teach to our children's strengths!

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Show Notes

Shawna Wingert of Different by Design Learning joins us to talk about teaching to our children's strengths in the homeschool.

  • Hi Lynna, Thank you for this…it is very enlightening!! Through much trial and error in homeschool we have found to use strengths to help weaknesses. For example, my daughter dislikes History, but loves drawing. She has much difficulty retaining information from just reading, but she is a very bright student. We have learned that “doodle note taking” helps her retain information while at the same time fostering her love for drawing. It has definitely been a game changer! She also loves that I draw alongside her. I noticed this helps in case her drawings didn’t clearly showcase the information to where it’s easily memorizable. Sometimes she will use my paper and sometimes she will use her paper for reference. Just throwing it out there for any other mothers that need help with their “visual” learners.